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Personal Finance from Forbes.com

  • Social Security Q&A: Will Court-Ordered Payments from My Ex Reduce My Benefits?
    Today?s question asks if payments from an ex-spouse ordered by a court will reduce Social Security benefits. The answer reviews the effect of the court-ordered payments on retirement benefits based on the questioner's own record as well as on spousal and survivor benefits based on the ex's record.
  • 10 Sneaky Online Shopping Tricks For Scoring Major Discounts
    Online retailers use crafty ploys to score big with shoppers. Bargain hunters can strike back with tricks of their own. Here are 10 tips to help you nab the biggest discounts.
  • The Facts On Increasing The Minimum Wage
    The minimum wage is one of those topics which tends to create a lot of attention. Those in favor argue that it will help the economy. Those opposed say it will hurt small businesses. Raise it? Keep it the same? What's the best decision? Find out in this article.
  • On Faith And Finance
    I did something really scary. My soul’s desire to go back to freelancing finally overpowered my need an infinite stream of paychecks, a cadre of charming coworkers, and all the Tazo tea I could drink in a day. I sat down with my manager, stammering as I told her, “I have some news …” and then quit, giving a month’s cushion to tie up and transition projects. I gave her a hug, went back to my cubicle and felt like throwing up.
  • October Slump: When Markets Drive Themselves
    Investors love the idea of being able to predict the future. People who wouldn't be caught dead engaging a roadside psychic or fooling around with tarot cards nevertheless are convinced that some months are "good" for stocks and some months are "bad." We saw this happen once again in October of this year. Pundits far and wide wrote in the late summer and early fall that the market was due to correct, if not crash, in October. How would they know that? They wouldn't, but as it happens three of the biggest market collapses in history occurred in October: The Panic of 1907, the Great Crash of 1929 and Black Monday in 1987. Convincing, right? Yet there's really no evidence to support the idea that October is to blame. Almost every month has its periodic declines at some point in history. Like the "June swoon" and the "Santa Claus rally," these trends are reinforced by repetition: They tend to happen because we expect them to happen. Crowd psychology is a funny thing. If you look at last month, our most recent October, you see a huge slump in the S&P 500. Nevertheless, there were similar (albeit not as deep) slides in February, April and August. Oddly, though the market recovered from the October decline this year and went on to new highs, nobody talks about November being a perpetually "great" month for investing. Why would they? The presumption by many investors is that stocks will rise in the future, a trend supported by long-term statistical studies. In fact, equities have beaten all other investments handily, returning 6.6% annually. That's about twice the rate of growth of the economy, a result researchers suggest is a reflection of reinvested dividends. Put another way, held for the long run, stocks keep up with the economy in terms of appreciation and return double that on reinvested capital.
  • The Family (Business) That Stays Together...
    Heading into the Thanksgiving holiday, some of us will be taking a few days leave from our employers – while some will be sitting down with them over turkey and stuffing.
  • 15 Ways To Avoid Holiday Debt
    How to enjoy a debt-free holiday season.
  • Shop For Your Retirement Bucket List This Holiday Season
    Retirees can use Black Friday, Cyber Monday and other holiday shopping deals to begin checking things off your bucket list. Here's what to look for.
  • 5 Financial Opportunities To Be Thankful For This Thanksgiving
    As we gather for Thanksgiving tomorrow, hopefully you have a lot to be thankful for. You may be thinking of things like your good health and rewarding relationships but you probably also have a lot more to be thankful for financially than you may realize. Here are five financial opportunities you may be thankful for and how you can take advantage of them:
  • 6 Ways We Succumb To Holiday Overindulgence -- And How To Keep It In Check
    It?s a time of family, feasts and festivities?which can easily lead to excess. Here?s how to handle the season of too, too much.
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