America's Best Paid Vacation

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BOWLING GREEN, Ky We are nearing one of the most liberated times of year in America. People begin to peel back the pool coverings and retreat to the fortress of the backyard with an ice-cold drink in hand.
Children see the light at the end of the tunnel as the school year comes to a close, and they are presented with the limitless hope of summer. Among all the days of relaxation and adventure, you can’t forget about the rich crack of a baseball bat that is a signature sound of summers in downtown Bowling Green.
Bowling Green native, Ben Morrison, has maintained that summer freedom even through his adult life. The 23-year-old has been enjoying his summer touring the Midwest with the single-A Burlington Bees. On Wednesday, that journey took him back to BG for a game against the Hot Rods. In his two innings pitched, he only allowed one runner on base while dishing out a strikeout as well.
We are nearing one of the most liberated times of year in America. People begin to peel back the pool coverings and retreat to the fortress of the backyard with an ice-cold drink in hand.
Children see the light at the end of the tunnel as the school year comes to a close, and they are presented with the limitless hope of summer. Among all the days of relaxation and adventure, you can’t forget about the rich crack of a baseball bat that is a signature sound of summers in downtown Bowling Green.
Bowling Green native, Ben Morrison, has maintained that summer freedom even through his adult life. The 23-year-old has been enjoying his summer touring the Midwest with the single-A Burlington Bees. On Wednesday, that journey took him back to BG for a game against the Hot Rods. In his two innings pitched, he only allowed one runner on base while dishing out a strikeout as well.

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(Steve Roberts, WKU Athletics)
“I had an actual job as a physical therapist over the summer and I was like, ‘man this job stinks, I want to go back to being a minor leaguer.’ So I was happy to back to spring training and give it another season.”
Morrison has been having a terrific season for the Anaheim affiliate. As a right-handed relief pitcher, the former Hilltopper has been cold-blooded in his 13 1/3 innings only allowing four hits on the season… This outstanding start to the year is largely because of his incredible freedom that he has felt on the mound.
“Confidence has really been the key,” Morrison explained. “This year I came in with a clean slate, and I just go out there and enjoy every inning I have.”
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(Steve Roberts, WKU Athletics)
Like many pitchers, Morrison has a very cool façade that gives the impression that he doesn’t even understand what pressure is. This comes in-part because of his incredible well-roundedness. Unlike many players in the minors, the 2018 CUSA All-Conference honoree’s plans for his career spans much farther than just the baseball diamond.
“I’m way more than just a baseball player, and I like to tell myself that after a bad inning,” said Morrison. “It’s really easy to get in that mindset that your innings don’t define you.”
The former BGHS outfielder has undertaken his mission to go to the major league completely by surprise. After enduring a shoulder injury in his junior year at WKU, Morrison bounced back in heroic fashion posting a 2.21 ERA during his senior year. Without knowing it, he wowed MLB scouts enough to get picked in the 10th round of the MLB draft.
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(Steve Roberts, WKU Athletics)
Morrison went into that summer thinking he had a firm grip on life. He had just graduated from WKU with a spotless 4.0 GPA and had just began volunteering with KORT physical therapy before planning on going to University of Kentucky for medical school.
Then, in the middle of June, the WKU grad got the call from the Angels and had to pick up his life and move within a matter of days. From the hills of Bowling Green, Kentucky to the mountains of Orem, Utah, Morrison found himself living in a complete stranger’s home as he eased into the nomadic life of a minor leaguer.
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(Steve Cirinna, Bees Media Relations)
“They have host families in Utah with us, so it was nice being in a family environment when we weren’t playing,” said Morrison.
The righty reliever’s path through the minors hadn’t always been smooth sailing. After a few bad performances in the fall, he had some doubts about his career choice.
“Last year, when I had my first bad outing, I was like ‘is this really what I want to do, I’m so far away from home.’ I called my Dad after that and we had a long conversation and… that kind of took the pressure off me.”
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(Steve Cirinna, Bees Media Relations)
By the end of the fall season, Morrison had finished his transition to the pros recording the fifth best WHIP on the team out of players who pitched over 20 innings. This may seem underwhelming, until you learn that he was vying for playing time amongst 34 pitchers. The key to his success was becoming much more accurate while bringing in a mixture of different pitches.
“Here you have to hit your spots. You really have to locate and mix pitches. Whereas in college, if you have the stuff you can just blow by guys,” explained Morrison.
Baseball has brought Morrison plenty of experiences throughout his career. This is the first time though, that he’s stepped away from the comfort of his Bowling Green home. Through his time in the minors, Morrison has learned to quickly build trust and chemistry with those around him.
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(Steve Cirinna, Bees Media Relations)
“There are so many different people from all different walks of life and backgrounds, so learning how to interact with those people and trust those people is a skill that I’ve developed that’s helped me,” said Morrison.
For now, the relief pitcher is enjoying his time in isolation on the mound. In the future though, Morrison would like to pick up where he left off and before being drafted by the Angels. After going through rehab on his shoulder in college, he was driven to serve others through in a similar way.
“I still want to pursue medicine,” said Morrison. “I’m really passionate about helping people and interacting with patients and using my skills and interest in science to help people.”